Tag Archives: CPRS Students

CPRS Toronto’s Doris Whiteside Award winners share tips for success in PR school

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Education Chair and Board Member Heath Applebaum recently caught up with each of the seven outstanding 2016 recipients of the Doris Whiteside Award. The awards are given to one deserving student at each Toronto public relations program annually, who exemplifies both academic excellence and outstanding leadership qualities. To qualify, students must be members of CPRS Toronto.

Heath asked the seven winners to reflect back on their academic journeys and share their advice for current and future public relations students. Valuable insights and tips to make the most of their academic experience and prepare for the real world after graduation.

Kristen Cockburn
Program: Public Relations Post-Graduate Certificate, Loyalist College
Status: Communications Advisor, Public Health Ontario

“Public relations is definitely an exciting field, but it can also be a scary journey to embark on.  Trust me, as someone who made a career change, I know how intimidating the decision to go back to school can be. One thing I did differently this time around, which I think contributed to my success, was that I really pushed myself out of my comfort zone; there’s no better time than school to do that. Whether it is being in front of the camera, selecting a personal story to tell in an assignment, or asking a professional from a networking session for a follow-up coffee, I took this time to push my personal and professional boundaries. My advice to current and future public relations students would be to take every experience in your program as a future opportunity. Put the extra effort into your assignments and build a great portfolio, stay connected with your classmates, and talk to everyone who walks through your classroom. You never know where that door may lead.”

Zena Schmidt
Program: Advanced Diploma Program, Humber College
Status: Completed PR internship and looking for her next big opportunity

“Attending the Public Relations Advanced Diploma program at Humber College was an amazing journey. When I think back to all the professors and fellow students that took part in shaping my learning experience, I will be forever grateful. If I was to give current and future public relations students helpful advice it would be this: collaborate with your teammates; one solid unit working together is always better, and more productive, than one person operating alone. When facing obstacles, don’t simply identify the problem, be an integral part of the solution. Most importantly, compete with yourself. It is not about being better, or brighter, than the person beside you, it is about constantly challenging your personal best. Embrace your internships, be a self-starter and believe in yourself. Confidence is key; people notice it and respond to it. The transition from the academic and internship world to the real work world can be daunting. Be persistent, patient and network, network network.  In closing, a thirst for knowledge is an exceptional gift; wake- up every day with an inquisitive mind and a passionate heart.”

Erika Manassis
Program: Corporate Communications Post-Diploma, Seneca College
Status: Account Coordinator at Cohn & Wolfe Canada

“I say the same thing to all PR students that I’ve met since graduating – volunteer, and get hands-on experience. No matter how strong you are academically, there is only so much that can be learned in the classroom.  So, get out there. If I had to do my public relations program again, I would tell myself to get in the habit of reading more news, from more sources. Being a student can certainly be busy, even stressful at times, but setting aside time to read the news (newspapers, magazines, websites, social media – everything) has so much value. I believe it has made me a better PR practitioner, because I have learned to recognize the names and interests of the writers and editors that I now communicate with regularly, and I am beginning to be able to identify editorial trends. I wish I had started this habit sooner.”

Lori Talling
Program: Public Relations Post-Graduate Certificate, Ryerson University
Status: Program Coordinator, Sport Tourism, Regional Municipality of Durham

“From my first Intro to Public Relations class, I knew Ryerson’s post-graduate certificate in Public Relations was the right path for me. I loved the content and I was fueled by a desire to learn all that I could about public relations. I often spent hours researching assigned topics, I took an active role in group work, which included listening and learning from other students, and I considered quality a high priority. In my view, enthusiastic, open-minded, hard-working and engaged students will achieve the most success in the program. I recommend that students treat course assignments as opportunities to apply what they are learning and prepare for future roles in the field – work hard and have fun, collaborate, and be prepared to go the extra mile to make your mark!”

Amy Gingerich
Program: Post-Graduate Certificate Program, Humber College
Status: Account Coordinator, Veritas Communications

“One of the most important things I learned during school was to create positive relationships, with fellow students, professors and connections. This can come from a lot of things: being respectful, going above and beyond, and keeping your word, are three that seem like common sense, but are often forgotten. The public relations world is small, and memories are lasting, so the impression you make now can affect you later. Absorb as much as you can, especially when you’re learning from seasoned pros, and use their knowledge as much as you can.
Once you’re in the working world, be ready to work hard, but know that especially at the beginning, it’s not always the most glamorous work. Do it enthusiastically and you’ll make a great impression, and that’s always important when you want a reference or to move up the ranks.”

Stephanie Murphy
Program:  Public Relations Graduate Certificate Program, Centennial College
Status: Communications and Public Engagement Coordinator, Canadian Red Cross

“The best piece of advice I can think of – for both school and employment – is to take the opportunities that come your way. The best way to learn in this field is by doing, so when your instructor asks you to help with an extracurricular project, or your boss asks you to support in a new way, take it as an opportunity to learn and grow – you never know what may come of it! It will also show your dedication. While you’re in school, your instructors are a great resource. They’re industry professionals after all! Whether you have questions about an assignment or are interested in something they did in their career, chat with them outside of class time. In the workplace, if there’s a particular project you’d like to work on, or skill you’d like to develop, definitely ask. There are so many opportunities to learn in the workplace, but sometimes you have to speak up so your supervisors know you’re interested.”

Ashley Haraburda
Program: Bachelor’s Degree, Public Relations, Humber College
Status: Media Officer, The National Ballet of Canada

“Find ways to get involved in the public relations community. Throughout my time at Humber, I attended CPRS networking events, went on informational interviews and volunteered at agencies and events. You never know where one connection could take you. The more hands-on experience you gain outside the classroom, the better prepared you will feel when you start your career.”

 

Where are they now?

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Featuring Erika Manassis, Seneca College Student Representative, CPRS Toronto Student Steering Committee

What did you enjoy most about being on the SSC?

Being on the SSC gave me the opportunity to not only attend student events throughout the year, but to help plan them. I enjoyed acting as liaison between my peers at Seneca College, and my fellow committee members, because it meant I could help make sure that the interests of my classmates were reflected in our SSC events. This made occasions like Passport to PR, and PR 360 much more relatable and applicable to students. It felt great to have a hand in that experience!

As a member of the SSC I was also introduced to non-student members of CPRS Toronto, many of whom I keep in touch with today. The opportunity to mingle with and learn from professionals in the field was invaluable to me as a student trying to find my place in this industry.

And of course – I’ll always be grateful for having met my fellow SSC members through this committee! Though we came from different personal and professional backgrounds, and now work in various fields, it’s nice to know that I have a support system of 15 amazing individuals close by!

Where do you work now, and what do you do?

In April 2016 I joined the team at Cohn & Wolfe Toronto as an Intern. In mid-July I took on the position of an Account Coordinator.

As an Account Coordinator I have a wide variety of responsibilities. From media monitoring, to developing coverage reports, to communicating with bloggers, to pitching stories to media outlets across the country. Every day is different. Most of the portfolios I work on are consumer products, which allows our team to have a lot of fun with story angles, creative pitch notes and media events.

One aspect of my job that I most enjoy is developing relationships with Canadian journalists.  It can be difficult to get to know journalists over email, so I continue to attend CPRS Toronto events each month, where the focus is often on how to communicate with members of the media. At work, I develop these relationships by making phone calls instead of emails to journalists when possible, and doing my best to know what a journalist typically looks for in a story idea.

How do you think CPRS Toronto helped advance your career or get you ready for your current position?

Volunteering with CPRS gave me “real world” PR experience while I was still a student. Continuing to volunteer now that I work at a PR agency offers many opportunities to continue to learn from industry colleagues, and experts in the field. Since joining CPRS Toronto as a student member in September 2015, it has been nothing but a beneficial personal and professional experience!

LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/erikamanassis

Where are they now?

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Featuring Terrence Freeman, Vice President, External, CPRS Toronto Student Steering Committee

What did you enjoy most about being on the SSC?

What I liked most about being on the SSC was having significant responsibility on the experiences and events we were creating for Toronto PR students.  As an executive member on the committee, I took part in making the decisions that would affect students’ CPRS Toronto experience, which also helped me grow professionally.

Where do you work now and what do you do?

During the summer, previous to my last year in Humber College’s bachelor of public relations program, I completed a public relations internship with Metro Ontario. Working client-side in a corporate marketing department allowed me to not only develop real-world industry experience, but also explore my interest in other aspects of marketing in addition to PR.

As I came closer to finishing my degree, I was offered a marketing coordinator job at Metro Ontario – and gladly accepted! While working on the more “traditional” marketing side of the industry I have continued to learn a vast amount of knowledge. I’ve also found that I have been able to transition much of my public relations skills to communicating to customers in other ways that the marketing aspect requires.

In my current position, I focus on everything “in-store” related. This includes communicating a variety of important messages to customers using multiple marketing elements including audio, signage and creative.

Although I originally had planned a career in public relations for myself, I am happy that my career path has steered into the broader world of marketing – a side of the industry that allows me to utilize the communications skills I learned in school and learn new skills I hope to apply throughout the rest of my career.

How do you think CPRS helped advance your career or get you ready for your current position?

Not only did my position on CPRS Toronto provide me with unique “real world” experience, but it also allowed me to meet and learn directly from top professionals in public relations industry.

Twitter: @itsterrence

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/terrencegfreeman

How First-Year PR Students Can Stand Out: Lessons from Michelle McTeague, Publicity Manager at Shaw Media

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As the first year of my public relations program comes to an end, I now understand the importance of securing an internship in the field. An internship in PR allows you to hit the ground running, get hands-on experience and really get a feel for the industry.

That’s why it’s important that, as first years, we bring our “A” game to interviews and always leave a great impression on potential employers. Though graduation is still three years away, it’s never too early to start preparing for internship opportunities.

Michelle McTeague, Publicity Manager at Shaw Media, offered us her advice at this stage in our professional careers, speaking from experience and her in-depth knowledge of the industry. After graduating from Durham College with an Advanced Diploma in Public Relations, Michelle accepted a publicity internship at Bell Media. She went on to hold positions at TIFF, Dancap Productions Inc., and FLIP Publicity & Promotions Inc. Today, as a publicity manager, her portfolio includes Food Network Canada, Showcase, Slice, and Lifetime.

Here is Michelle’s expert advice on how first-year PR students can prepare for their internships, and really stand out from the competition.

What can a student do to make their resume stand out?

It has to be attention grabbing, great format, unique and uses keywords. Your resume also has to be error-free, make sure to always spellcheck. It has to be as detailed as possible and very strategic.

What are the key documents/materials to have in your portfolio?

A cover letter that is tailored to the specific job position, key writing samples, mock releases, event flow, and mock event. A range of your writing shows the employer your thought process, how you were being strategic and how you leverage different social media platforms and other tools.

Many first-year PR students may not feel the need to think about their internships right now. Why is it important to start preparing for your internship in the beginning of your program?

Preparing now gives you a sense of where you want to start. Networking and keeping in contact with the employer is also very important since it could be where you first officially begin working in PR. Also, be passionate about what you want, it will show in your work.

Are there any specific extra-curricular activities that employers look for on a resume that first-year PR students should be involved in now?

Employers look at any extracurricular activities that enable you to showcase some of your skills. However, make sure you identify and draw out what is relevant to the job. Also, include what sets you apart from the competition. Personal development should never stop.

Can you outline the expectations vs. reality when it comes to internships?

Don’t have too many expectations. Go into any opportunity with the mindset that you are a sponge, you want to learn and absorb as much as possible. Instead of expectations have a set of objectives. For example, “By the time I finish my internship at Google, I want to know how to write an effective press release.”

Are there any skills you think we should focus on now to prepare for internships?

Time management, prioritization, organizational skills and communication skills are very important skills to hone and to have. When it comes to prioritizing, if you’re not sure what’s most important to complete, or how to prioritize a long list of tasks, never hesitate to ask your employer or professors for advice.

What precautions should first-years have online when entering this industry?

Think before you do anything!

How can first-year PR students build or improve their social media presence or personal brand?

Share your interests, and think of how you can be your own publicist. You could also showcase your favourite brands in positive ways (like in a blog post!).

What sector would be the most beneficial for a first-time intern? Agency, in-house, corporate…?

A great place for first-year PR students to start, especially when you’re young, is agency. Be prepared to give your all! Finding the right placement can be rewarding professionally. If you’re not sure where you want to work, base the decision on your heart-of-hearts and the products you want to promote. Try everything to find out what you want. Also, remember doors never close!

Written by: Tomiko Stanton is a first-year student at Humber College, in the Bachelor of Public Relations program.

Speed Networking – A look inside PR 360

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On April 7, the CPRS Toronto Student Steering Committee (SSC) hosted their last event of the 2015/2016 school year, which took place at the Chelsea Hotel in downtown Toronto. A total of 72 public relations students from across the GTA attended the event, which allows small groups of students to intimately sit with professionals from a variety of public relations sectors.

Of course, the hot topic of the night for students was internships. They sought out advice on how to be exceptional during the internship hiring season and how to better their chances at landing their dream job.  In additional to these useful tips, the participating professionals shared additional industry insights.

At the Finance table, Laurrell Mohammed, Corporate and Public Affairs Manager at TD Bank Group, stressed the importance of being able to “sell yourself” in an interview. David Rowney, Senior Manager of Canadian Banking Communications at Scotiabank, added that volunteering for your choice company is a good place to start.

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Mike Van Soelen, Senior Principal from Navigator Ltd., seated at the Crisis Communications table, defined the process of building media relationships as “tricky” and explaining the importance of developing thick skin. While Vice President of NATIONAL PR, Jeff Roman, and NATIONAL PR Associate, Laura Poplak, advised that students should consider how to help the media you’re working with, and to offer them your support.

In the Government session Keerthana Kamalavasan, Senior Communications Advisor for the Office of the Mayor, recommended letting your coworkers know which projects you’re especially interested in and making yourself invaluable. Brendan Agnew-Iler, Account Director from Argyle Public Relationships, gave the students wise words to ponder whilst pursuing a career in PR: “If you’re not failing sometimes, you’re not trying hard enough.”

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From left to right: Lauren Poplak, Brian Rosevear, Linda Andross, Tracy Ford, Dan Young, Jeff Roman, Mike Van Soelen, David Rowney, Laurrell Mohammed, Abby Albino, Brendan Agnew-Iler, Christine Faulhaber, Jeanette Jones, Sandra Gregory, Debra Goldblatt-Sadowski, Jennifer Wasley, Samantha Taus, Ogho Ikhalo and Keerthana Kamalavasan

 The event showcased the range of positions in which public relations students could find themselves in their future. Other sectors included in the event were Consumer/Corporate, Global/Mid-size Agency, Non-Profit, Sports, Entertainment and Hospitality. Following the table discussions, attendees were free to mingle, network and try to glean final bits of crucial advice.

Not only was the night a fantastic chance to meet professionals, but it also provided a great opportunity to connect with other PR students entering the field. The SSC will be back in September for another great year of student-focused events.

It is a wonderful time to be in public relations and good luck to all the students this year heading into the industry!

Elyse Carney is a representative on the SSC currently attending Durham College.

Passport to PR’s Shaw Media, Paradigm PR and FleishmanHillard Sessions

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Group A visits the Shaw Media, Paradigm PR and FleishmanHillard offices

Battling spring showers and Toronto traffic, we arrived unscathed and (fairly) dry at one of Toronto’s communications hot spots – Bloor Street. We were set to meet and explore three diverse and equally awesome communications and PR organizations: Shaw Media, Paradigm PR and FleishmanHillard.

We heard it all from the Shaw Media crew

ShawMedia2

First up on the list, Shaw Media. Right from the start the team had our group laughing and well caffeinated. We learned that a day in the life of a Shaw Media communicator is always varied. From organizing media tours for Chopped Canada’s Brad Smith to establishing their talent as subject matter experts to sending Supergirl capes across the country, Shaw Media communicators are constantly on the move. The team also gave some great advice for any PR and communications student looking for their first internship.

“Be resourceful and people will remember you.” – Jacqui, Senior Publicist for Global

“Volunteer inside of your organization to meet new people and expand your professional network.” – April, Publicity Coordinator for Food Network Canada

As for the golden rule of media relations, Greg, Associate Publicist, told students to be “100 per cent reliable, 100 per cent of the time.”

Paradigm PR gives us a glimpse into agency life

Next up on our route, Paradigm PR, a creative consumer PR agency. After introductions and Timbits we saw a number of client case studies. A favourite was definitely the media relations for Toy “R” Us’ ‘Chief Play Officer’ (every child’s dream job).

Johnathon, an intern turned account coordinator, went on to describe the variety of accounts he gets to work on, and the challenges he faced when transitioning from school to work. Anticipating what’s next in agency life can be difficult, as you’re moving top speed (almost) all the time. He credits attention to detail and meeting last minute requests as a sure way to build great relationships inside and outside your agency.

The Paradigm PR team also stressed the importance of company culture fit. Do your research, ask for informational interviews and find out as much as you can about the dynamic, clients and day-to-day rhythm of the agency. When you know the company culture you’ll know if it’s the right place for you to thrive.

Johnathon’s parting words of wisdom, “Be hungry.”

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FleishmanHillard introduces us to the diversity of PR

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FleishmanHillard greeted the group with a number of faces from across different practices and various levels. From associate consultant to senior partner, the presentation was full of interesting insight into FleishmanHillard and the communications industry itself. The unanimous decision from the FleishmanHillard team, agency is the right place to “earn your chops”, build your professional network and gain exposure to many different elements of the industry.

We saw sizzle reels from consumer brands such as Uncle Ben’s Beginners, which leveraged influencer Logan Guleff (MasterChef Junior winner) to get more kids in the kitchen. We also learned about their work with Bayer, a healthcare company, for a completely different take on communications. The campaign was creative in building community around “Hemophilia Champions.” Without direct mention of the brand in any of the communications, it was all about relationship building between stakeholders.

One of the best pieces of advice we learned from FleishmanHillard: take a shot; initiative goes a long way.

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Until next year

Passport to PR was an amazing introduction into the very busy lives of PR and communications professionals. The candid conversations, exposures to real client work and bits of wisdoms from so many talented professionals were extremely valuable. If you get the chance to join a CPRS Passport to PR group, don’t hesitate. It’s a learning experience that you cannot find in any classroom at school.

To see more photos of the event and other locations click here: http://on.fb.me/1YRX3Pa 

Written by Sarah Rogers, Centennial (Story Arts Centre) PR Post-Graduate Certificate Program student and representative on the Student Steering Committee

 

 

Informational interviews: three reasons why you should go to one

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Informational interviews are less stressful than job interviews and offer practical career advice outside the classroom. Instead of reading a company’s “About” page I have found it more effective to reach out to someone I admire and pick their brain to accelerate my career search.

After researching professionals on LinkedIn, I came across Humber PR alumna and former TVO public relations manager Kathy Saliba. I was eager to meet with her and our second degree connection was kind enough to introduce us.

I learned a lot from our coffee chat and she offered relevant industry advice. Here are three reasons why I recommend going on informational interviews:

1) Gain insight from industry professionals.

It’s a great opportunity to ask specific questions about their personal experience, which you won’t get from an online search engine.

Kathy’s advice:

  • Be open-minded. Opportunities can open up where you least expect them.
  • Be a sponge. Absorb as much information as you can. Make the most of every experience.
  • The learning process is never ending. Keep searching for opportunities to grow. Take advantage of the professional development and training courses offered online, at work or through professional organizations such as the CPRS Toronto Society.

2) Their knowledge of the industry can help you choose your path:

I was interested in learning about the differences between working in a large firm, boutique agency and corporate setting. Since Kathy had experience in all three she was able to shed some light on the subject.

Kathy suggested trying different work environments throughout your career to determine your preferred lifestyle and sector.

Informational Interviews

3) Helpful career tips

Kathy generously shared advice on how to succeed in job interviews:

  • Read the company’s press releases and conduct a media audit to become more informed about the employer’s latest projects.
  • In case of any questions about media relations, research media outlets tailored to the company’s clients or products. It’s a good habit to form a media list filled with specific traditional media, online bloggers and influencers.
  • Research the person you are interviewing on LinkedIn to see if you have any shared connections or experiences you can bring up in the interview.

I encourage students and recent graduates to go on informational interviews if they want to build their confidence and learn more about their future. The more you go on and the more interview practice you obtain, the more prepared you will be to navigate your PR career.

By: Alessandra Manieri, Post-Graduate Public Relations Humber College

 

 

 

Passport to PR: Opening Doors for Aspiring PR Practitioners

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Quotes

If attending this event isn’t on your to-do list, you should definitely add it.  The positive real life discussions helped reinforce my decision about whether or not a public relations career is right for me.

I had the opportunity to visit and learn from the communications professionals of three very different organizations: Veritas Communications, Google Canada and the Toronto Region Board of Trade.

Each organization demonstrated unique approaches to public relations and provided specific examples of what they did for their clients/organization.

At Veritas, the team discussed how they helped launch Target’s entrance into the Canadian market. The presentation allowed us to hear firsthand the challenges and successes that were encountered. The demanding yet exciting environment is exactly why agencies appeals to many aspiring PR professionals. This type of organization seems to keep you on your toes with no day similar to another.

Google’s Alexandra Hunnings, gave a very powerful presentation. Alexandra spoke freely in an informal conversation about the world of PR through the eyes of Google, which was truly amazing and inspiring to hear. Three key takeaways were Nurture, Own and Follow Through. My visit to Google taught me that not everyone is going to be good at everything but identifying your strengths and weaknesses will help mould you into successful communicator.

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Matthew Kofsky, from Toronto Region Board of Trade, spoke to us about the importance of getting experience. Specifically, not just experience to land a job, but rather experience that will help you grow as an individual and help you to become a better person in all aspects of life.

This was my second year participating in Passport to PR and it gets better every year. This event allows students to meet industry professionals who give great insight into their organization and productive career advice. Additionally, participants can learn what its like to work in public relations outside of the classroom. After completing one session after the other you feel inspired, motivated and excited to tackle and succeed as a public relations professional.

The CPRS Toronto Student Steering Committee will be holding another Passport to PR event will be held in March 2016. Hope to see all of you there!

By: Tysha Campbell, CPRS Student Steering Committee student representative for Centennial College’s Bachelor of Public Relations Management program.

CPRS Toronto Student Steering Committee Profile: Centennial

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Get to know our 2015/2016 student representatives from Centennial College’s three public relations programs.

 

 Tysha

Tysha Campbell
Centennial College, Bachelor of Public Relations Management

Hi, I’m Tysha. I currently live in Oshawa, Ontario and commute three days a week to school. This is my second year volunteering with the committee and I am looking forward to the networking opportunities this year has to offer.

What are you most excited for this year?
This year I am most excited for Building Media Relationships event and hopefully meeting and making some new connections with the media.

What do you do outside of school?
I am currently volunteering with Pride Toronto on the accessibility team, and I am so excited and happy to be working with such a great organization.

Tell us something unexpected about yourself:
I’ve taken a road trip to Belize! Took us six days but we finally made it!

Connect with Tysha:

Twitter: @tyshaax_

LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/pub/tysha-campbell/a4/40a/131

 

 Sarah


Sarah Rogers 

Centennial College, Graduate Certificate in Public Relations (Story Arts Centre)

Hello! My name is Sarah and I’ll be representing the postgraduate certificate program at Centennial College, Toronto. I’ll be honest, when applying for the program I wasn’t completely sure what to expect. However, after these first few weeks of classes I’m certain I’ve landed in the perfect place!

What are you most excited for this year?

Along with being introduced to the diversity of the PR industry, I’m really excited to be part of the CPRS Toronto Student Steering Committee. The events that CPRS Toronto holds are truly amazing, and it sounds like this year they’ll be bigger and better.

What do you do outside of school?

Other than school I like to be outdoors, hiking and biking. When time (and money) allows I also like to travel.

Tell us something unexpected about yourself:

I went on a trip to Southeast Asia a few years back, and ended up staying for three years!

Connect with Sarah:

Twitter: @slrogers6

LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/slrogers6

 

Sophiti Johnson
Centennial College, Post-graduate Certificate in Corporate Communications and Public Relations (Pickering)

Hello everyone. I am currently enrolled in the Corporate Communications and Public Relations Certificate at the Pickering Learning Site of Centennial College.

What are you most excited for this year?

I am most excited for the year to end. I know it sounds bad, but hear me out. By the end of this year, I will have gained practical experience from both my program and from the working with the SSC. These experiences will equip me with the skills needed to enter the workforce and build my own brand. So yes, I cannot wait for it to end, because it means I have completed a crucial point in my learning, and I am well on my way to beginning an exciting career.

What do you do outside of school?

I work part time at a music studio as a receptionist. I am also on the board for a pageant and I am working on starting my own lifestyle blog. I also volunteer with organizations like the Canadian Liver Foundation.

Tell us something unexpected about yourself:

I am a fighter. This is my mantra at the moment. No matter what is thrown at me or despite the obstacles in my path, I will find a way to keep moving, keep pushing, and keep surviving.

Connect with Sophiti:

Twitter: @SophiRJ

LinkedIn: ca.linkedin.com/in/sophitijohnson

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Congratulations and welcome to all our 2015/2016 Student Steering Committee representatives.

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter @CPRSStudents